1. Winemaking

Harvest exclusively manual once the grape has reached its optimum maturity. We only use "Flower Must" as our raw material, must known to be of the highest quality, as it flows by itself from the grape when squeezed.

2. First fermentation

The varietal musts are fermented in stainless steel vats by adding selected yeasts. A meticulous control of the temperature, usually between 15 and 18 degrees, allows us to sharpen to the maximum the different aromas, so typical of the autochthonous grapes of the region. Through this process, which usually lasts between 20 and 25 days, the must is transformed into the base wine.



3. The coupage

The oenologist, once the base varietal wines have been selected, determines the proportional amount of each grape variety, which are usually Xarelo, Macabeo and Parellada.

A greater proportion of Xarel-lo will result in a cava with greater body and structure, with more acidity and suitable for ageing. On the other hand, with a greater predominance of Macabeo and Parellada we will obtain a more aromatic and fresh cava, ideal for younger cavas.

4. Tirage

Once a year, during the months of February and March, we do what is known as the tirage, which is the filling of bottles of base wine, wine yeasts and sugar.

The bottles are stoppered with stainless steel or cork stoppers and distributed by transporter belts throughout our winery, and then stacked in mountains of bottles known as rimas.

.


5. Second fermentation

During the next three months, a second fermentation will take place inside the bottle, it is responsible for obtaining the carbonic gas which is so characteristic of this sparkling wine.

From here the ageing of the cava begins, which is extended more or less depending on the type of cava, being in the case of Mas Xarot Brut a minimum of 15 months, and a minimum of 60 months in Mas Xarot Gran Reserva.

.

6. Riddling

Once the ageing of the cava is finished, it is time to remove the sediments produced by the yeasts during the second fermentation. We achieve this by inclining and turning the bottle itself one eighth of a turn every day for two weeks in the traditional cava desks.

This way we can deposit the sediments in the neck of the bottle, which already rests turned to vertical position.



7. Disgorging

It consists in opening the bottle in a precise and measured way, allowing that with the pressure of the bottle the sediments are expulsed and thus obtaining a perfectly clean wine.

> Today, this operation can be made mechanically and by freezing the neck of the bottle to facilitate the task, or manually and handcrafted, as we do in all our Gran Reserva cavas.

8. Closure and labelling

Now all that is left is to close the bottle with a cork stopper, place the well-known muzzle to avoid an accidental opening due to the pressure of the interior, label it and package the bottle. It is ready for tasting.


1. Winemaking

Harvest exclusively manual once the grape has reached its optimum maturity. We only use "Flower Must" as our raw material, must known to be of the highest quality, as it flows by itself from the grape when squeezed.

2. First fermentation

The varietal musts are fermented in stainless steel vats by adding selected yeasts. A meticulous control of the temperature, usually between 15 and 18 degrees, allows us to sharpen to the maximum the different aromas, so typical of the autochthonous grapes of the region. Through this process, which usually lasts between 20 and 25 days, the must is transformed into the base wine.

3. The coupage

The oenologist, once the base varietal wines have been selected, determines the proportional amount of each grape variety, which are usually Xarelo, Macabeo and Parellada.

A greater proportion of Xarel-lo will result in a cava with greater body and structure, with more acidity and suitable for ageing. On the other hand, with a greater predominance of Macabeo and Parellada we will obtain a more aromatic and fresh cava, ideal for younger cavas.

4. Tirage

Once a year, during the months of February and March, we do what is known as the tirage, which is the filling of bottles of base wine, wine yeasts and sugar.

The bottles are stoppered with stainless steel or cork stoppers and distributed by transporter belts throughout our winery, and then stacked in mountains of bottles known as rimas.

.

5. Second fermentation

During the next three months, a second fermentation will take place inside the bottle, it is responsible for obtaining the carbonic gas which is so characteristic of this sparkling wine.

From here the ageing of the cava begins, which is extended more or less depending on the type of cava, being in the case of Mas Xarot Brut a minimum of 15 months, and a minimum of 60 months in Mas Xarot Gran Reserva.

.

6. Riddling

Once the ageing of the cava is finished, it is time to remove the sediments produced by the yeasts during the second fermentation. We achieve this by inclining and turning the bottle itself one eighth of a turn every day for two weeks in the traditional cava desks.

This way we can deposit the sediments in the neck of the bottle, which already rests turned to vertical position.

7. Disgorging

It consists in opening the bottle in a precise and measured way, allowing that with the pressure of the bottle the sediments are expulsed and thus obtaining a perfectly clean wine.

> Today, this operation can be made mechanically and by freezing the neck of the bottle to facilitate the task, or manually and handcrafted, as we do in all our Gran Reserva cavas.

8. Closure and labelling

Now all that is left is to close the bottle with a cork stopper, place the well-known muzzle to avoid an accidental opening due to the pressure of the interior, label it and package the bottle. It is ready for tasting.